60% percent of Aboriginal children significantly behind non-Aboriginal children by the time they start Year One.

(Koori Mail, 390).

Indigenous young people are overrepresented in the child protection system (5–7 times as high), and in the juvenile justice system and prison (each 15 times as high).

(AIHW, 2011)

In 2018, the attendance rate for Indigenous Australian students was 82%, compared with 93% for non-Indigenous Australian students.

(ACARA, 2018)

In 2018, the attendance rate was 23% lower for Indigenous students in Very remote areas (63%) compared with Inner regional areas (86%) and Major cities (85%).

(ACARA, 2018)

An Aboriginal student’s chance of employment rises by 40% if they complete year 10 or 11. Completing Year 12 increases employment prospects by a further 13%.

(NSW DET, 2004)

NAPLAN scores show the percentage of low SES, Indigenous and remote-area students below the standards in reading, writing and numeracy is between 5 to 9 times greater than high SES students.

(Reid, 2015)

Enrolment rates for non-Indigenous students stand at almost 100%. Whereas school enrolment rates for Indigenous children have been increasing over time from 84.1% in 2008 to 97.8% in 2014.

(EDUCATE AUSTRALIA FAIR?: Education Inequality in Australia Report, 2017)

10% of Aboriginal children graduate from Year 12.

(PS News Online, 2015)

Over half of all Year 10 Koorie students are still in school two years later (Year 12), compared with 83% of non-Koorie students.

(Victorian Government, 2015)

The gap in student attendance rates between Indigenous and non-Indigenous students remains constant throughout primary school, averaging around 8 percentage points, but deteriorates rapidly once high school commences, reaching 15 percentage points by Year 10.

(EDUCATE AUSTRALIA FAIR?: Education Inequality in Australia Report, 2017)

64% of early childhood Aboriginal students are enrolled in pre-school.

(Koori Mail, 494)

Only 35% of Indigenous students in the Northern Territory continue through to Year 12.

(EDUCATE AUSTRALIA FAIR?: Education Inequality in Australia Report, 2017)

Secondary school attendance rates for Indigenous students in very remote areas are 20 percentage points lower than Indigenous students living in major cities.

(EDUCATE AUSTRALIA FAIR?: Education Inequality in Australia Report, 2017)

The Northern Territory has the widest gap in attendance rates between Indigenous and non-Indigenous students in both primary and secondary school; 20.2 and 28.4 percentage points respectively.

(EDUCATE AUSTRALIA FAIR?: Education Inequality in Australia Report, 2017)